thebittersweetdistractor

thebittersweetdistractor:

THE KNIFE
Without You My Life Would Be Boring-Shaken-Up Version [Rabid Records]

On June 20, The Knife are digitally releasing Shaken-Up Versions a mini album of classic tracks reworked especially for the band’s recent North American leg of their “Shaking The Habitual Tour”. To preview the new versions, the Shaken-Up version of ‘Without You My Life Would Be Boring’ is being released today, accompanied by a video directed by Bitte Andersson.

Tracklist:

  1. We Share Our Mothers’ Health (Shaken-Up Version)
  2. Got 2 Let U (Shaken-Up Version)
  3. Bird (Shaken-Up Version)
  4. Without You My Life Would Be Boring (Shaken-Up Version)
  5. Pass This On (Shaken-Up Version)
  6. Ready to Lose (Shaken-Up Version)
  7. Stay Out Here (Shaken-Up Version)
  8. Silent Shout (Shaken-Up Version)
darksilenceinsuburbia

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Klaus Pichler

Just the Two of Us

Who hasn’t had the desire just to become someone else for a while? Dressing up is a way of creating an alter ego and a second skin which one’s behaviour can be adjusted to. Regardless of the motivating factors which cause somebody to acquire a costume, the main principle remains the same: the civilian steps behind the mask and turns into somebody else. For this photo series I visited owners of elaborate costumes in their own homes. As a matter of fact, ‘just the two of us’ deals with both: the costumes and the people behind them.

Website

the-sleepiest
At 19, I read a sentence that re-terraformed my head: “The level of matter in the universe has been constant since the Big Bang.”
In all the aeons we have lost nothing, we have gained nothing - not a speck, not a grain, not a breath. The universe is simply a sealed, twisting kaleidoscope that has reordered itself a trillion trillion trillion times over.
Each baby, then, is a unique collision - a cocktail, a remix - of all that has come before: made from molecules of Napoleon and stardust and comets and whale tooth; colloidal mercury and Cleopatra’s breath: and with the same darkness that is between the stars between, and inside, our own atoms.
When you know this, you suddenly see the crowded top deck of the bus, in the rain, as a miracle: this collection of people is by way of a starburst constellation. Families are bright, irregular-shaped nebulae. Finding a person you love is like galaxies colliding. We are all peculiar, unrepeatable, perambulating micro-universes - we have never been before and we will never be again. Oh God, the sheer exuberant, unlikely fact of our existences. The honour of being alive. They will never be able to make you again. Don’t you dare waste a second of it thinking something better will happen when it ends. Don’t you dare.
Caitlin Moran  (via harukimuracallme)
One thing I always feel in the midst of trying to talk coherently about a story I’ve finished is that, you know, ninety per cent of it was intuitive, done at-speed, for reasons I can’t quite articulate, except in the “A felt better than B” way. All these choices add up, and make the surface of the story, and, of course, the thematics and all that—but I’m not usually thinking about any of that too much, or too overtly. It’s more feeling than thinking—or a combination of the two, with feeling being in charge, and thinking sort of running around behind, making overly literal suggestions, and those feelings being sounded out and exercised and manifested via heavy editing and rewriting (as opposed to, say, planning and deciding). The important part of the writing process, for me, is trying to make choices that push the story in the most interesting direction, by which I mean the direction that causes the story to give off the most light. The story’s goal is to be fascinating and stimulating and irreducible; the writer’s job is to micromanage the text to make this happen.
George Saunders, in an interview with the New Yorker, talking about his short story The Semplica-Girl Diaries.